Things you should ask about before signing a job acceptance letter

Things you should ask about before signing a job acceptance letter

Today, May 1st is considered a national holiday in more than 80 countries, Nigeria inclusive and what better time to talk about issues affec

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Today, May 1st is considered a national holiday in more than 80 countries, Nigeria inclusive and what better time to talk about issues affecting the labour market than today. While we celebrate workers who make the economies of countries stronger, we can’t also run away from the fact the economies of most countries of the world, including some of the strongest economies, has taken a huge blow as a result of the coronavirus pandemic ravaging the world

For this reason, many companies, both huge and small will have to readjust and streamline their activities. Companies will be forced to count their cost, downsize greatly, seeing that most positions do not necessarily require physical attendance.

For instance, while Access Bank Plc is planning to reduce their staff strength, United Bank for Africa, UBA, had earlier in the year, retrenched thousands of their staff across their network, only retaining those who they felt were capable of producing results. Perhaps they must have had an insight into what was to come. Also, media houses now see the need for their staff to work remotely and to also rely more on their online presence.

But despite this, some companies will still see the need for recruitment. While some will recruit to fill in normal positions, others will recruit professionals who have digital/virtual training or experience. For anyone who may fall into this category, here are some pertinent questions to ask the Human Resources Manager, just before you sign your acceptance offer to avoid regrets later.

1.    Do not accept a job offer based on gross pay alone.

2.    Find about your NET pay

3.    Pension plan: Find out if the company subscribes to a pension. Know how much the company will be deducting from your salary and how much they are willing to add to it. Normally, it should be 14% on both sides. And be sure they are signed on to a reputable pension firm

4.    PAYE amount

5.    13th month: Some companies don’t bother with this but a few others a sticklers to it. It is usually paid at the end of the year or in the first few weeks of the new year.

6.    Bonus and Profit sharing: Again, some companies keep all their profits for the founder or in some cases, a few of the management staff. Others are magnanimous enough to carry their staff along and give them a percentage of their profit. The bonus is usually given to staff who have performed exceptionally well in the year in review.

7.    Lunch provision (optional)

8.    Leave allowance: Some companies are magnanimous enough to pay leave allowance while some don’t. For those companies who pay, some pay the full salary while others pay either half or a quarter of the salary. Decide what is comfortable for you.

9.    Health insurance: Again, this varies from company to company. Some companies are signed on to Health Maintenance Organisations.

10. Notice period: This varies from company to company in terms of disengagement. Find out what works for the company you are about to be signed on.

Most companies operate a slave/master style. Some will promise you heaven and earth without actually stating it in black and white only to renege. Be vigilant. Don’t allow yourself to be cheated out of desperation.