Kingsley Moghalu quits politics, says youths are a big disappointment

Kingsley Moghalu quits politics, says youths are a big disappointment

Professor Kingsley Moghalu, the presidential candidate of the Young Progressive Party (YPP), has announced his withdrawal from partisan politics. T

Vogue Arabia faces backlash for putting Saudi Princess on cover while women activists remain in jail
UK government plans to build prison in Nigeria
Electoral offenders to punished by electoral act – INEC counters Buhari

Professor Kingsley Moghalu, the presidential candidate of the Young Progressive Party (YPP), has announced his withdrawal from partisan politics.

The former deputy governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) who bagged the 14th position with only 21,886 total votes in the last general election, said he was now going to dedicate his time to a citizens’ movement called Build A Nation (TBAN) which seeks to help in the development of Nigeria’s electoral process.

“We’re engaging on a non-partisan basis to a platform called To Build A Nation (TBAN), a citizens’ movement that will campaign for electoral reform and engage in voter education. Those are the two things this democracy needs if it is to survive,” Moghalu said.

Asked if he would accept a political appointment if such should come from President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration, he said “If such an appointment is offered, then you reflect on it and make a decision.”

Kingsley Moghalu in the same vein blasted Nigerian youths over voting in elections stating that Nigeria youths are a huge disappointment. The former presidential candidate said that Nigerian youths will rant and rail but will not reflect their frustrations when casting votes during elections.

“The biggest disappointment in the last general elections was with the youths. The youth vote was absent. They make a lot of noise, they rant and rail but you will not see them on the voting day. And when they vote, they don’t vote in line with their rhetoric. It is true that the youth account for over 70 percent of the population in Nigeria according to reports but most of them who seem frustrated by the system refused to vote and attempt to change the status quo.”